Veterans Benefits

Are you a disabled veteran? If so, and you aren’t currently receiving benefits, or you are receiving benefits that do not reflect the extent of your disability, we may be able to help. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs pays a disability compensation benefit based on the extent of your service-connected disability. You may also qualify for additional benefits if you have dependents.

To qualify for veterans disability compensation, you have to satisfy three basic tests:

  • You must have a current, medically-diagnosed disability.
  • The injury or disease must have had an onset while you were actively serving in the armed forces.
  • Your current disability must be service-connected. That is, related to your time in active service.

Disabilities that qualify for compensation aren’t limited to obvious battlefield injuries. You may also be able to qualify for benefits as a result of back injuries, knee and ankle injuries, TBI (traumatic brain injuries) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Additionally, you may also be able to qualify for benefits for illnesses or conditions arising from exposure to these hazards:

  • depleted uranium
  • nuclear fuel rods and other radiation sources
  • loud noise resulting in hearing loss
  • complications from anthrax or smallpox vaccines
  • Agent Orange and other defoliants
  • nerve agents
  • biological agents
  • aviation and diesel fumes and other toxic chemicals and substances
  • … and much more.

The list of illnesses and conditions that may qualify for benefits is nearly unlimited. You need only demonstrate that your illness or condition meets the criteria above.

Other Veterans Benefits

The veterans disability compensation plan – the one that pays the veteran according to their percentage of disability – is well known among the veteran community. But many veterans and veterans’ families are unaware of other valuable benefits they may qualify for, depending on their circumstances. Examples include grants for adoptive housing, the Spouse and Child pension, the veterans pension for needy or low-income or permanently and totally disabled veterans over age 65, and the Aid and Attendance Benefit, which assists housebound veterans in activities of daily living in their homes.

Dealing With The V.A.

The Veterans Administration is a big and notoriously difficult bureaucracy to navigate – even for professionals. Veterans have found it extremely difficult to get their claims approved working on their own. Even where claims are approved, many times the VA only approves a disability rating that does not adequately compensate the veteran. Having an experienced attorney on your side to guide you through the process – and, if necessary, fight on your behalf – is crucial.

Your attorney can help you with the following:

  • Reviewing your case to determine if you may be able to prove that your condition is service-connected.
  • Help you prepare the needed documentation.
  • Arrange for the necessary medical and vocational rehab screenings and evaluations to support your claim.
  • Determining which benefits you may be able to qualify for
  • Helping you through setbacks and claim denials
  • Appealing your case through the VA system, the U.S. Court of Veterans Appeals, and potentially all the way to the Supreme Court of the United States.

Getting Started with Veterans Benefits

There is never any fee for an initial consultation with a veterans benefits attorney at Burke Harvey, LLC. We invite you to call our Birmingham offices today at 205-930-9091. Clients elsewhere in Alabama and in Tennessee, Georgia or Florida should feel free to call us toll free at 888-930-9091 for honest answers to your questions concerning veterans benefits and related issues, or to schedule an appointment.